NC State University Stream Restoration Program

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Stream Restoration Program

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Technical Resources

Introduction to Taxonomy and Ecology of EPT (Workshop Workbook 2008)

Benthic macroinvertebrate larvae (aquatic insects) play key roles in many regulatory water quality programs in North Carolina. Not only are these insects used to detect water pollution problems, but are also used to determine if streams are perennial features, and are proposed for use in stream restoration projects as success criteria. Despite the value of this group of organisms in North Carolina's regulatory programs, very little is known about these bugs. This workshop introduces the participants to the basic ecology and taxonomy of aquatic insects. Most of the emphasis is on learning family level identification of mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies (or EPT). This workshop series was supported by NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality (NCDENR-DWQ) and USEPA Section 319.

Cover and Agenda for 3-day Workshop (pdf)

Streamkeepers Guide, Dichotomous Key to Stream Macroinvertebrates (pdf)

Key to Macroinvertebrate Life in the River (pdf)

An Introduction to the Taxonomy and Ecology of EPT Families (pdf presentation)

Mayfly (pdf presentation)

Stonefly (pdf presentation)

Caddisfly (pdf presentation)

Wrap-Up: An Introduction to the Identification and Ecology of EPT Families (pdf presentation)

Keys to Mayflow Nymphs, Stonefly Nymphs, Caddisfly Larvae, Eastern US from Brighma et. al. 1982 (pdf)

On Sight Identification Guides to the EPT Groups (pdf)

Glossary (pdf)

Family Notes (pdf)

Field and Identification Tips (pdf)

Worksheets for Family Biotic Index and Functional Feeding Group Calculations (pdf)

Photographic References (pdf)

Websites with Benthic Insect Information (pdf)

Regional Curves

Bankfull hydraulic geometry relationships, also called regional curves, were first developed by Dunne and Leopold (1978), and relate bankfull channel dimensions to drainage area.  Gage station analyses throughout the United States have shown that bankfull discharge has an average return interval of about 1.5 years or 67% annual exceedence probability.  The primary purpose for developing regional curves is to aid in identifying bankfull stage and dimension in an un-gaged watershed and to help estimate the bankfull dimension and discharge for natural channel designs.

Note: These are draft relationships. The relationships/curves are sufficient for identifying bankfull stage in ungaged watersheds. However, caution should be used in applying them to natural channel designs until the final relationships have been peer reviewed and published.

See River Course Fact Sheet #3 for more detailed infomation of Identifying Bankfull in North Carolina streams.

US Forest Service Video on Identifying Bankfull in forested Eastern US streams.

USFWS Hydraulic Geometry Relationships in the Maryland Piedmont and Mountains

Regional Curves for the Three Physiographic Regions of North Carolina

Coastal

Piedmont - Rural

Mountain - Rural

Piedmont - Urban

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